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Case Study


FEATURED PRODUCT

1532086129_Silicon-Designs-Introduce.jpg

Silicon Designs announces Model 2422H MEMS variable capacitive accelerometer modules


Date:2018-07-20


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Silicon Designs announced the global market introduction of its Model 2422H low-voltage, specialty hermetic, MEMS variable capacitive accelerometer modules.

Available in eight models, with standard ranges from ±2 g to ±400 g, the Model 2422H series is designed for zero-to-medium frequency vibration and acceleration sensing, in commercial and industrial applications where a hermetically sealed case and +5 VDC regulated power supply are absolute requirements. Design of the Model 2422H series incorporates Silicon Designs’ own MEMS accelerometer. Modules are packaged in an IP67 rated, hermetically sealed lightweight titanium case, for added protection from moisture, dust, corrosion, and other contaminants. Units are mounted via two screws, adhesive, or a magnet. The IP61 rated connector of the Model 2422H meets IP67 requirements when sealed with a boot, sleeve, or heat shrink.

The Model 2422H series produces differential analog output voltage pairs (AON & AOP) which vary with acceleration. Signal outputs are fully differential about a common mode voltage of approximately 2.5V. Modules can support either a ±4V differential or 0.5V to 4.5V single ended output, for complete measurement flexibility. They can also respond to both DC and AC (0 to 2000+ Hz) acceleration. At zero acceleration, differential voltage output is nominally 0 VDC; at ± full-scale acceleration, it is ±4 VDC. Units are also relatively insensitive to temperature changes and gradients over a standard operating temperature range of -55°C to +125°C. Each accelerometer module is shipped directly from the factory fully calibrated and serialized for traceability.

All of Silicon Designs MEMS variable capacitive accelerometers and chips are 100% designed, manufactured, and tested at the company’s facility in Kirkland, Washington, USA. This includes the manufacture of the chips and dies themselves.

Source :automation.com